The word crochet derives from the French word for hook and the craft of crocheting involves the creation of fabric from lengths of thread or wool using hooked crochet needles.

Crochet most likely started during the 19th century in Europe.

Steel hooks come in various sizes from 3.5 to 0.75 millimeters which are used for fine crochet work. The sizes of plastic or aluminum hooks range from 2.5 to 19 millimeters.

In addition, to using thread and wool many crafts people in particular jewellery designers use the technique of crochet to create interesting a unique pieces of work.

Starting
Crocheting is started by placing a slip knot onto the hook, then pulling another loop through the first loop and continuing the process until a chain is made of the necessary length. The chain is worked into rows and stitches made by pulling loops through each loop of the chain. Below are listed some of the basics of crocheting:

Slip stitch
The slip stitch can be used with other stitches to create elaborate designs. Work a slip stitch along a chain, by inserting the hook from front to back underneath the top two loops of the second chain. Move the wool anti-clockwise over the hook, drawing it through the chain and loop on the hook. This leaves one loop and one cross stitch has now been done. Repeat the process until the end.

The slip stitch can be used for shaping and working in round to join the first and last stitches.

Half Treble
The half treble produces a fine fabric. When working the base row, move the wool over your hook and insert the hook front to back underneath the top two loops of the third chain away from the hook. Move the wool over the hook and through a loop to make three loops on the hook. Take the wool over the hook pull though the three loops, leaving one loop remaining and one half treble worked. Move the wool over the hook and again work a half treble into the chain. Repeat this process to the last chain. Turn over your work. Work two chains that will count as the first half treble and missing the the first half treble of the previous row , work into the next stitch. Work a half treble into each half treble up to the turning chain and then work a half treble into the top of the turning chain.

Double treble
When working the base row, move the wool anti-clockwise over the hook twice, pushing the hook front to back underneath the two top loops of the fifth chain along from the hook. Move the wool over the hook once and pull it through the first two loops on the hook, leaving three loops on the hook. Move the wool over the hook and pull it through the first two loops on the hook, leaving two hoops. Move the wool over the hook and pull it through the remaining two loops on the hook. This leaves one loop and one double treble completed. Repeat this process into each chain to the end. At the start of each row, work four turning chain as the first double treble. Work into the top of the four turning chain, the final double treble at the end of each row.

To count the number of stitches (loops or chains), do not include your first slip knot or the loop you have on the hook. It helps to keep the chain from twisting.